New Publication!: The Disappearance of Black and Latino Teachers in New York City

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Appreciating teachers means that we fully understand not only the forces that pushout educators, but how the pushout of Black and Latino/a educators impacts all of us.

The New York Times recently asked the question "Where Are the Teachers of Color?" Meanwhile, Brittany Cooper wrote about the significance of this issue in Salon, noting: "An attack on Black teachers is an attack on Black children, Black families, and Black communities."

Teachers Unite is proud to present "The Disappearance of Black and Latino Teachers in New York City," a research collaboration of NYC public school teachers, research students, and professors from New York University and the City University of New York convened by Teachers Unite.

While it is generally acknowledged that more Black and Latina/o teachers are needed in New York City, the fact that the DOE is hiring fewer and fewer of these teachers is less well known. Alarming data in our report include the following:
-Although nearly 70% of NYC public school students are Black and Latina/o, only 34% of teachers are Black and Latina/o.
-New hires of Black and Latina/o teachers are declining dramatically
-Growing racial and economic inequality makes it more difficult for low income Black and Latina/o students to become teachers in NYC.

Read the report to learn more! Come talk with us about it at the June 4th Bronx Educator Conference!